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Comet Hale-Bopp Images - August 1997

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Observer: Mark Gransden
Location: Jindera, New South Wales, Australia
Date: August 2, 1997 05:30 AM AEST

1. 50mm, f1.8, 20secs, about 5:30am, ASA 400.

2. zoom on previous 2/Aug/97 image with contrast enhancement to show tail detail.


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Observer: David Jones
Location: Lake Maroon, Queensland, Australia
Date: August 2, 1997 19:00 UT

8" f/1.5 Schmidt Camera, 2 minutes, Kodak PJM640.


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Observer: Mark Gransden
Location: Jindera, New South Wales, Australia
Date: August 3, 1997 05:25 AM AEST

50mm, f1.8, 20secs, 5:25am, ASA 400.


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Observer: Mark Gransden
Location: Jindera, New South Wales, Australia
Date: August 4, 1997 05:23 AM AEST

50mm, f1.8, 30secs, 5:23am, ASA 400.


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Observer: STS-85 Astronauts
Location: Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85), Earth Orbit
Date: August 9, 1997

1. A narrow portion of the first, quick-reduction, SWUIS Hale-Bopp comet acquisition image taken from Discovery is shown here with minimal processing.

2 & 3. Seen here is an image formed by coadding approximately 2200 frames of broadband data. Both comet Hale-Bopp (at 3 AU heliocentric distance) and a number of background field stars can be seen. The left and right panels are different logarithmic stretches of the same coadded image, depicting different details in the image. The field of view of this image is about 0.5x0.6 deg, corresponding to a linear scale of ~4.0e6x4.8e6 km. The Sun is to the lower right. During STS-85, SWUIS imaged Hale-Bopp on 9 orbits over a period of 5 days, gathering more than 400,000 useful images in the visible and UV. The actual flight data have not yet been returned to us, but preliminary coadds such as these from downlinked SWUIS video reveal that good signal was received on the comet during each run on orbit.

4. A false-color 23s integration of comet Hale-Bopp obtained during the aquisition for Discovery's 2nd orbit of SWUIS observations.


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Observer: Mark Gransden
Location: Jindera, New South Wales, Australia
Date: August 10, 1997 05:54 AM

135mm, f2.8, 20 seconds (with Barndoor Tracker) and ASA1600.


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Observer: Alberto Quijano Vodniza
Location: Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Date: November 9, 1996 - October 11, 1997

Images taken with a ST-6 CCD camera through a 16 inch, F10 reflector.


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Observer: STS-85 Astronauts
Location: Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85), Earth Orbit
Date: August 12, 1997

This image consists of a brief burst of coadded SWUIS data taken aboard STS-85 on 12 Aug 1997 during the second SWUIS imaging run. Seen here is an image formed by coadding approximately 1000 frames of broadband data. Both comet Hale-Bopp (at 3 AU heliocentric distance) and a large number of background field stars can be seen. The field of view of this image is about 0.15x0.10 deg, corresponding to a linear scale of ~1.2e6x0.8e6 km. The image is presented with log scaling to show parts of the coma with large brightness differences. The Sun is to the right. During STS-85 SWUIS imaged Hale-Bopp on 9 orbits over a period of 5 days, gathering more than 300,000 useful images in the visible and UV. The actual flight data have not yet been returned to us, but preliminary coadds such as these from downlinked SWUIS video reveal that good signal was received on the comet during each run on orbit.


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Observer: Hal Weaver
Location: Hubble Space Telescope, Earth Orbit
Date: August 27, 1997 - February 19, 1998

The above figure shows the post-perihelion images of Hale-Bopp obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Each frame is only 1.25 x 1.25 arcsec in size (25 x 25 CCD pixels), which means that we are focussing here on the innermost regions of the coma. The horizontal bar in each case subtends a distance of 500 km at the comet.

All three images have been normalized to the same peak brightness and displayed using the same logarithmic intensity stretch. There has been no image processing to enhance, for example, any coma jets or shell structures that might be present. The images have not been rotated to a common orientation because that would involve resampling the images, which leads to degradation of the resolution. Instead, the compasses show the celestial orientation of each image.


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Observer: Alberto Quijano Vodniza
Location: Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Date: August 30, 1997 09:10:04 UT

Image was taken with a ST-6 CCD camera trough a 16 inch, F10 reflector with 10 sec exposure. The field of view is 5.5 X 7.3 arc min.


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Observer: David Jones
Location: Jondaryn, Queensland, Australia
Date: August 30, 1997 18:45 UT

Exposure Details : 8" f/1.5 Schmidt Camera, 5 minutes, Hypered Kodak PJM640. Hale-Bopp's dust tail passes over M93. Photographing conditions difficult due to gusting winds and thin cloud. Streaks on film are scratches.


If you would like to submit a new image to this home page, contact:
Ron Baalke
ron@jpl.nasa.gov

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