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Wallace Images of Comet Hale-Bopp

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Observer: James C. Wallace II
Location: Terre Haute, Indiana
Date: February 23, 1997 10:45, 10:47 UT

Image 1: Taken at 5:45am EST on Feb. 23, 1997 near Terre Haute, IN by James C. Wallace II, Student Director, John C. Hook Memorial Observatory, Dept. of Geography, Geology and Anthropology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. Image acquired using Fujicolor 3200 Super G film at f/3.4, 28mm wide angle lens. exposure is at 30 seconds. Foreground is illuminated by the full moon. Although not apparent in photo, tail is over 2 degrees long, curving upwards to the southeast. Magnitude estimate is 1.0. Binocular view is outstanding.

Image 2: Taken at 5:47am EST on Feb. 23, 1997 near Terre Haute, IN by James C. Wallace II, Student Director, John C. Hook Memorial Observatory, Dept. of Geography, Geology and Anthropology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. Image acquired using Fujicolor 3200 Super G film at f/3.4, 70mm zoom lens. Foreground is illuminated by the full moon. More apparent in this photo is the tail, which is over 2 degrees long, curving upwards to the southeast. Magnitude estimate is 1.0. Binocular view is outstanding.

Other observations:

During this time, the tail was quite unique. It curved upward and to the Southeast for over 2 degrees. A Questar 3.5, brought along for close-up views revealed a very dynamic coma structure, with what appeared to be a set of jets extending outward from the leading front of the nucleus and being blown back to one side, although a small portion of gas and dust appeared to travel to the other side of the nucleus, giving the coma a somewhat lopsided appearance, much like a bent horseshoe. Overall, the sight was impressive and made it difficult to put my equipment away until twilight took over.

James C. Wallace II
wallace@geosun.indstate.edu


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