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The Journey to Jupiter Introduction Launch Cruise Arrival Orbital Tour Extended Tour Europa The Spacecraft Mission Operations

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Arrival at Jupiter and the Probe Mission
An artist's depiction of the Galileo Probe Spacecraft
An artist's depiction of the Galileo Probe Spacecraft

The Galileo spacecraft and probe traveled as one for almost six years. In July 1995, the probe was released to begin a solo flight into Jupiter.

Five months later, the probe sliced into Jupiter's atmosphere at one-hundred-six-thousand miles per hour. It slowed, released its parachute, and dropped its heat shield. As the probe descended through ninety-five miles of the top layers of the atmosphere, it collected fifty-eight minutes of data on the local weather. The data were sent to the spacecraft overhead, then transmitted back to Earth.

An artist's depiction of the probe releasing the parachute
An artist's depiction of the probe releasing the parachute
It appeared that Jupiter's atmosphere is drier than we thought. Measurements from the probe showed few clouds, and lightning only in the distance. It was only later that we discovered that the probe had entered an area called a "hot spot."

Towards the end of the 58 minute descent, the probe measured winds of four-hundred-and-fifty miles per hour - stronger than anything on Earth. The probe was finally melted and vaporized by the intense heat of the atmosphere.

To get into orbit around Jupiter, the spacecraft had to use its main engine. An error could send Galileo sailing past the planet. There was just one chance to get it right. After hours of anxious waiting, mission controllers confirmed that the spacecraft was safely in orbit. Galileo was alive and well and had begun its primary mission. The maneuver was precisely carried out, and Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter.

 
Quick Facts about Probe Mission

Release Date
7/13/95

Penetration into Jupiter's Atmosphere
12/7/95

Entry Speed
106,000 mph

Probe Data Return
59 min
3.5 megabits

Penetration depth
200 km (124 mi)

 
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The Probe Mission Events Diagram

The Probe Mission Events Diagram
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Last updated 12/11/01.

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